We service the Fort Worth/Dallas area of Texas

Sweaty Dogs: NO Sweat, No Problem

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Contrary to popular dog do sweat and have some sweat glands. "While dogs primarily use panting to cool themselves down, they also sweat — but not where you may think", said Catherine Carrier, a veterinarian and Animal Operations Senior Manager at Covance Laboratories, a contract research facility that partners with pharmaceutical companies. It turns out dogs have sweat glands on their paw pads and noses.. which is hardly an efficient way to cool off. There is some scientific speculation that the sweat glands in paws and noises may have another purpose but we know it isn't for cooling off body temps

“Dogs do not have the same capacity to sweat like humans, therefore they cannot evacuate heat as efficiently from the skin surface and are prone to overheating and developing hyperthermia, an elevated body temperature,” says Patrick Mahaney, DVM, and owner of Los Angeles, California Pet Acupuncture and Wellness.

No Sweat: Big Problems? How the heck do they cool down?
Dogs pant as a means of evaporative cooling: when a dog gets hot, it will open its mouth and breathe heavily. As water evaporates from the dog's tongue, nasal passages and lungs, this helps lower its body temperature. Panting serves two main purposes in terms of cooling a dog down. Firstly, the moisture on the tongue evaporates while panting, while the heavy breathing allows moisture to evaporate from the moist lining of their lungs. Furthermore, dogs cool off via vasodilation. The blood vessels in their face and ears expand, enabling the blood to flow closer to the skin, allowing heat to be exchanged with the outside environment.

Spring has Sprung... with STORMS!


It is that time of year when Texas Weather throws the steering wheel out the window and makes life interesting. I have sen first hand the devastation that can be caused by tornadoes and hurricanes not only to structures but to lives. But it doesn't have to be a big storm to be an emergency for your family. A gas leak, plumbing flood, or a power outage may mean you have to evacuate your home fast and for a few days.

Being prepared can help minimize some of the stress for you and your pet should you need to evacuate your home.

-CRATE TRAINING
OK I get it .. your dog doesn't NEED the crate. But if you need to evacuate to a shelter your dog will be required to be crated. Or if you dog is injured they will be crated at the animal hospital... so to minimize the stress for your pet why not teach them the crate is a happy safe place? A crate with a familiar blanket or bed will be a safe haven in an emergency

-ALERT STICKER
On a front window of your home will alert first responders of the number and kind of pets in your home. This will assist in getting them to safety. IF you are able to evacuate with your pet, and have the time write EVACUATED on the sticker.

-ID
Layer your id to help assure a prompt reunion if you are separated from your pet. A collar with tags, microchip (is your information current?) and write your cell phone number on your pet... if your pet has long fur write it in the inside of an ear, if your dog is a dark color you can get a white or silver marker. This sounds silly but it is faster then scanning and may mean a quicker reunion. Keep a picture of your pet on your phone.. I also keep a copy of my pets vaccinations records as a picture.

-Veterinary Contacts
Obviously you want the name/number of your veterinarian in your phone but also have the name, address and phone number of the closest Emergency clinics.

-SAFE HAVEN
Do you have family or friends, a boarding facility or hotel names that accept pets? If you cannot car for your pets who is your backup caregiver? In a large scale emergency your local shelter may also offer temporary housing for your pets.

-EMERGENCY GO BAG
If you look on line you can buy a "Go Bag" but assembling one is easy. Check out the check list and make sure you have it all.

Obviously different species have different needs so check out this article by the sASPCA on Disaster Preparednes

PetMeds Cares


1-800-PetMeds® supports pet rescue and adoption through PetMeds Cares. This program’s primary focus is organizing donations of over-the-counter medications and products to U.S animal shelters and rescues. Rescue groups can apply to be considered for donations once each year. Great Dane Rescue is excited to be considered for this awesome program. To learn more visit PetMeds Cares